This is a new blog post series I’m starting, where I’m going to present three different logos I encounter in my everyday life, that I particularly like the design of.

1. Krayewski

Andre Krayewski (né Andrzej Jan Krajewski) is a Polish-born, US-based artist and poster designer, famous for his signature art-deco and pop art style. He is also a jazz lover and a writer, author of Skyliner, an autobiographical novel about America, jazz, beautiful women, and draft dodging in Poland in the 1950s. The name refers to a famous jazz standard by saxophonist Charles Daly Barnet. A few years after publishing the novel, Andre began a collaboration with his son Ed who translated it into English. Skyliner or 54, written by Ed Krayewski and illustrated and lettered by Andre Krayewski, came out in 2015 following a successful Kickstarter campaign to publish the 11 issue series as a graphic novel.

I don’t know who designed the logo that can be found on the artist’s website, but I think it is a very good visual representation of the style of work Krayewski does—his penchant for geometry, thick black lines, and stylized lettering. He’s also done a fair number of posters featuring guns (check out the guns category on his website), which probably explains the use of a gun shape in the logo.

2. Mariage Frères

A few years ago I was living with my friends, a lovely couple, whose passion for theatre, quality and beauty has a great impact on their lifestyle. Like many hard-working artists, they prioritize creative work over consumption. But there was one thing they cared very deeply about having a full stock of—and that thing was tea. When I first learned that they go all the way to Paris to bring  it, I thought it was a bit of an extravagance. After a cup of Full Moon, I instantly changed my mind. English tea companies are of very high standard but they can’t compare to the quality and level of artism displayed by Mariage Frères. This French gourmet tea company, based in Paris was founded in 1854 by brothers Henri and Edouard Mariage. According to an article in L’Express, in 2007 the company sold 380 tons of tea and had a turnover  43,5 millions euros.

The brand is elegant and sophisticated—so the logo should reflect that. And in my opinion, the logo, designed by MF Art Director, Franck Desains, does a pretty good job, with its beautiful condensed serif typeface, and the use of Italics with swirly tails, arms and open counters on T and P. The logo instantly gives a customer a sense of luxury and uniqueness, and we know it is a brand we can fully trust.

3. Disconnect


Disconnect, named one of the 100 best innovations of the year by Popular Science and one of the 20 best Chrome extensions by Lifehacker, was founded in 2011 on a belief that everyone has the right to privacy and that privacy should be the default online. Used by millions of people around the world, it is a user-friendly privacy and security software that lets people visualize and block the otherwise invisible websites that track our search and browsing history.

The Disconnect monogram is the perfect example of a logo that makes a great use of negative space. As designer David Airey says, it is hard to beat a clever use of white space, and its power shouldn’t be underestimated (do check out his blog post showcasing 35 logos which do it very well). The monogram fits very well in the address bar, where all extensions are placed. The full version of the logo has angled terminals, which look a bit like Seed Black and FF Profile Pro Black fonts.

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